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Rotherham, Yorkshire, England

 

Local Villages include

Aston, Aughton, Swallownest, Bramley, Masbrough

Brinsworth, Broom, Clifton, Moorgate, Maltby

Canklow, Catcliffe, Orgreave, Treeton, Kiveton Park

Dalton, Dinnington, Throapham, East Dene, Richmond Park

Eastwood, Herringthorpe, Greasbrough, Kimberworth

Hellaby, Harthill, Hooton Roberts, Ickles, Kilnhurst

Laughton-en-le-Morthen, Anston, Northfield, Thornhill

Parkgate, Ravenfield, Rawmarsh, Warren Vale, Swinton

Templeborough, The Brecks, Listerdale, Thorpe Hesley,

Thrope Salvin, Thrybergh, Thurcroft, Hardwick, Morthen

Slade Hooton, Todwick, Ulley, Wales, Wath upon Dearne

Cortonwood, Hollowgate, Manvers, Newhill, Westfield

West Melton, Wentworth, Shiston, Wickersley, Woodsetts

 

Early history

While there is evidence of Iron Age and Roman settlements on the site, the city itself did not begin until the Middle Ages. The early name of this village was Rodreham in 1086, meaning ‘homestead or village on the River Rother’. Rother is a Celtic name that means ‘chief river’. The Saxons used it as a market town and later was an important area due to parishes on both sides of the River Don. William the Conqueror eventually claimed this village for his half-brother, Robert, Count of Mortain, from the Saxons.

 

In the 15th century the Archbishop of York worked to build a new university in the area hoping to compete with Oxford and Cambridge. The college and parish made the town more interesting, but the college dissolved in 1547 when King Edward VI striped all its good for Crown use.

 

The town took a hit in the 16th century with the loss of the college and became known for sin, vice and gambling. Iron, coal, glass and flour milling were all important to the growth of the area.

 

Recently the town has undergone an urban regeneration effort that they are calling the “Rotherham Renaissance” where many new shops, dining establishments, housing and attractions our being development to attract tourists and businesses to the town.

 

Attractions

Minster Church of All Saints – 15th century church that has stood in the same spot as 3 other churches since 937 AD. Great example of Perpendicular architecture. Also contains The Grammer School, also known as Thomas Rotherham College.

Clifton Museum – Built in 1783 with a Victorian kitchen, collection of glass pieces from the 18th century, and a public collection of Rockingham Pottery.

Boston Park – 23 acres opened in 1876 to celebrate the American Declaration of Independence. It is named after Boston, Massachusetts and has good views of Don Valley and the Peak District.

Magna Centre – the first science adventure center in England, created in a former steel plant.

Sherwood Forest – made famous by the legendary tales of Robin Hood.

Wentworth Family Farm – pet traditional British farm animals including Shetland cattle, Jacobs sheep, Bagot goats, and middle white pigs. Children’s play areas, farm games, tractor rides and a nice display of antique farming equipment.

Roche Abbey – founded in 1147, the historic building is open to the public and offers a coach park and refreshments.

Tropical Butterfly House, Wildlife & Falconry Centre – lots of animals, exotic reptiles and birds of prey.

 

Culture and Leisure

Rotherham is a pretty modern town. They have a night club scene along High Street, plenty of movie theaters such as the big one at the Valley Centertainment complex, a decent music scene with a strong Classic Rock presence, and many area attractions. Fast food style dining is big here, but a trend has developed lately encouraging more café style outdoor dining and celebrity chef, Jamie Oliver, working to improve eating in the town. Rotherham is a traditional sporting town with football clubs, rugby teams, speedway racing, and other athletic endeavors.

 

Events

Rotherham has its fair share of events from beginning to end. In March there is Science Weekend. The Magnificent Easter celebration is held around Easter annually. Museums at Night is a local tradition in May.  There are plenty of festivals including the Rotherham Heritage Festival and the Rotherham Walking Festival. Don’t miss the Spooky October Half Term in October or the Christmas Market at the end of the year. Year round open air markets are commonplace in South Yorkshire, as well as theatre shows, concerts, and other local events.

 

Retail therapy

The new Rotherham Renaissance project is expected to include major street retail shops, not counting their already well known brand shops like Tesco and Burtons. Other nearby shopping complexes include Parkgate Shopping and Meadowhall. Parkgate is one of England’s most popular and busiest retail complexes.

 

Tourism Service

The Rotherham Tourism Service is in place to offer support in the form of information and advice to new businesses and tourists. They meet every couple of months to discuss how the town is doing and what potential improvements might be needed. There is even an annual Tourism Forum dedicated to improving the town.

 

Visitors Centre/Tourist Information Centre

Both visitors and locals can use the Rotherham Visitor Centre to find information on local attractions, events, dining and lodging. The Centre offers a full range of professional staff who are familiar with the town and all it has to offer. There is also plenty of written material to help tourists get the most out of their Rotherham stay.

 

Walks

For some short walks around town consider partaking in the Doorstep walks through the countryside. There is over 400 kilometers of public paths and walkways around the town. There is a number of self guided heritage trails including Victorian and Medieval trails that pass by historic sites in the area.

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